Letters from George III to Lord Bute, 1756-1766
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Letters from George III to Lord Bute, 1756-1766 edited with an introduction by Romney Sedgwick. by George III King of Great Britain

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Published by Macmillan in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Great Britain -- History -- George III, 1760-1820.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsBute, John Stuart, Earl of, 1713-1792., Sedgwick, Romney, 1894-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA506 A2 A28
The Physical Object
Paginationlxviii, 277 p.
Number of Pages277
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14088737M

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This book contains letters written to Lord Bute by George III, as Prince of Wales and as King, between May and July These letters afford an opportunity for tracing the origin of the mythology that has grown up around George III. show more. Summary: This book contains letters written to Lord Bute by George III, as Prince of Wales and as King, between May and July These letters afford an opportunity for tracing the origin of the mythology that has grown up around George III. Letters from George III to Lord Bute by Romney Sedgwick and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at George III, King of Great Britain, Letters from George III to Lord Bute, London, Macmillan and Co., (OCoLC) Named Person: John Stuart Bute, Earl of: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: George, King of Great Britain; Romney Sedgwick; John Stuart Bute.

This book contains letters written to Lord Bute by George III, as Prince of Wales and as King, between May and July These letters afford an opportunity for tracing the origin of the mythology that has grown up around George III. Letters from George HI to Lord Bute. Edited by Romney Sedgwick. (Macmillan. as.) WE were nearly all, it seems, misled for years by those great corruptors of youth, the Whig historians. Perhaps the reaction against these shameless men has gone too far, but certainly on the question of George III and Bute they have erected a pretty but quite misleading legend which has an extra- ordinary. Letters from George III to Lord Bute, By George III; John Stuart Bute; Romney Sedgwick MacMillan, PS PRIMARY SOURCE A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Abstract. The Bill of Rights () had ordained that the monarch must be a Protestant. George III fulfilled this condition impeccably. In his first speech from the throne on 18 November he proclaimed the protection of the ‘Protestant Interest’ in Europe as a major British objective in the Seven Years’ War; 1 he ended his reign as a champion of the Protestant constitution with his Author: G. M. Ditchfield.

Letters from George III to Lord Bute, Edited with an intro-duction by ROMNEY SEDGWICK. (London: Macmillan, ) THIS publication is of great importance to historians. The Fortescue edition of George III's correspondence is very deficient in materials for the first five years of his reign, and especially for his relations with his. affairs American appointed army became bill Britain British brother Bute Bute's cabinet Chatham Civil List colonies conduct court Crown daughter death debts declared disliked Duke of Cumberland Duke of Gloucester Duke of York duty eighteenth century England Fanny Burney father favour favourite Fox's France Frederick French Grafton Grenville. George III and the historians. Herbert Butterfield Horace Walpole House of Commons ideas IIl's imagine important influence issue Jacobite John Wilson Croker kind King's Lecky letters Lord Bute Lord North Lord Rockingham ment merely mind ministers ministry modern monarch Namier school narrative oligarchy opposition About Google Books. The new king George III was twenty-two years of age when he succeeded his grand­father. The old king had always been on the worst of terms with Frederick Prince, of Wales and his wife; their residence, Leicester House, had habi­tually been the headquarters of opposition to the king's govern­ment; and young George was brought up to hold his grand­father in contempt, and to set before.